Lauren Sandler
In or out?In or out?
Earthenware with terra sigillata, fabric, resin, wire, paperIn or out? detailTemenosMythosMythosMythos detailTemenosTopophilia
earthenware with gold leafHidden Reception (left) and Temenos
earthenware, terra sigillata, gold leaf, wire, paperTemenos
earthenware, gold leaf, wire, paperTemenos detailHidden Reception
earthenware with terra sigillata, wire, paper, gold leafHidden Reception detail
Temenos Exhibition
Solo exhibition at The Clay Studio of Missoula
March, 2011
exhibition reviewed on Artmelt

Materials: Earthenware with terra sigillata, fabric, resin, wire, paper, gold leaf

Temenos Artist Statement
2012

Growing up in New York City I felt a great incongruity with my surroundings whenever I stepped out of the intimacy and comfort of my family’s small apartment onto the chaotic and prodigious backdrop of the city. This dual reality shaped my physical interaction and understanding of the world. Maneuvering through an urban landscape raised my awareness of architecture, structure of space, and my body’s relationship to it. I would find solace in intimate and vulnerable spaces: the quiet corner of the park with the cement mounds I transformed into mountains; the cobblestones on old streets I would isolate my gaze upon imagining I lived in another time; peering through the windows of the light-filled brownstones at night wondering how it felt to be inside.

My work has an affinity for the spaces where the visceral and structural meet, to a shared experience of body and architecture. In the interstice between the two exists the opportunity to symbolically explore paradoxical states where the prodigious is met by intimacy, the monumental is made vulnerable, and the absolute become fallible.

My recent body of work explores the experience of incongruity through the relationship and representation of different materials - clay, wire and paper, along with plastics and gold leaf. The suspended, arborescent forms, rootless yet made partly of clay; the ethereal quality of paper alongside the weight of clay or the gravity of poured plastic, or wire and paper edifices, all present a certain paradox. Through the often-contradictory elements of the materials physical properties I can conciliate seemingly irreconcilable experiences, such as permanence and impermanence, possibility and unattainability, stability and instability.

My thoughts about paradox and the experience of the inevitable dualities of our lives brought my attention to the Greek myths. The story of Persephone in particular played an inspiring role in my recent body of suspended pieces made for my show titled Temenos. The underworld Persephone travels to and the impending darkness of winter brought on from Demeter’s sadness, the subsequent life and growth upon Persephone’s return. The stories of the myths felt like the spaces of refuge I sought out as a child, a tangible and symbolic language to use in search for meaning and place.
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